What's the difference between an AVM and AV Fistula?

Been reading some more of my medical documents (don't see why people can't just let us try to get recovered, etc. without all the 'interference') and I have seen "AVM" and "AV fistula". (Per my 6-month follow-up appt. with my neurosurgeon, the document states "... AV fistula resection of the 4th ventricle involving the choroid plexus" and "post surgical changes compatible with suboccipital craniotomy".) Although I know there is an actual difference between "AVM" and "AV fistula", I am not exactly certain what the difference is. Can someone please help inform me (and not in medical terminology please)?

Thank you, in advance!

I found this:

http://174.120.2.174/board/showthread.php?p=14521

Does anyone know whether AV fistulas can POTENTIALLY 're-grow' like AVMs potentially can?

Cindy: An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a direct connection between an artery and a vein. The blood bypasses the capillaries and tissues, and returns to the heart. Arterial blood has a higher blood pressure than veins and causes swelling of veins involved in a fistula. AVF's are similar to AVM's in that they both disrupt the circulatory cycle.

An AVF is characterized by a single connection between and artery and a vein, whereas an AVM contains multiple arteries and veins.

There are two types of arteriovenous fistulas, congenital and acquired.

A congenital arteriovenous fistula is a rare birth defect that formed during fetal development.

An acquired arteriovenous fistula is one that develops after a person is born. It usually occurs when an artery and vein that are side-by-side are damaged, and the healing process results in the two becoming linked. For example, after catheterizations, arteriovenous fistulas may occur as a complication of the arterial puncture in the leg or arm.

Fistulas also form without obvious cause.

Hope this helped to clarify the difference...

Love and peace

hanne xxx

Hi Cindy. Look up Jaime G. on here!! He has an AV fistula too!!!

Thank you, Hanne and Barbara!!!



Hanne said:

Cindy: An arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is a direct connection between an artery and a vein. The blood bypasses the capillaries and tissues, and returns to the heart. Arterial blood has a higher blood pressure than veins and causes swelling of veins involved in a fistula. AVF's are similar to AVM's in that they both disrupt the circulatory cycle.

An AVF is characterized by a single connection between and artery and a vein, whereas an AVM contains multiple arteries and veins.

There are two types of arteriovenous fistulas, congenital and acquired.

A congenital arteriovenous fistula is a rare birth defect that formed during fetal development.

An acquired arteriovenous fistula is one that develops after a person is born. It usually occurs when an artery and vein that are side-by-side are damaged, and the healing process results in the two becoming linked. For example, after catheterizations, arteriovenous fistulas may occur as a complication of the arterial puncture in the leg or arm.

Fistulas also form without obvious cause.

Hope this helped to clarify the difference...

Love and peace

hanne xxx

Great explanation Hanna!
I know what an AVM looks like on a scan, but didn’t know what an AVF would look like. Your explanation makes it easy to visualize. Not to scare anyone with an AVF, but I would ask the question of your DR "Do you see any indications of a potential aneurysm as a result of this AVF?"
Now I’m pretty sure the DR can’t answer that. But an aneurysm can occur as a result of high pressure blood stretching a vessel. Just like in a vein that hasn’t had the pressure reducing effects of the capillaries… (This is according to DR Ron (me)).

THKS.
Ron, KS

Thank you, Ron.

You are absolutely correct in your aneurysm thought, Ron. Mine burst & hemmorhaged (and like so many others, that was the way my AVF/AVM became 'acknowledged').