Venous Drainage Lost

Hi there,

Has anyone had any experience of the loss of one (or both) venous drainage systems in the brain. My son (20 months), has an AVM in the VoG; he's had 6 embolisations, and more recently it was discovered that one of his venous drainage systems was lost. Can anyone provide any info about this?

Thanks,

Norwin

Norwin
I’m not really sure where in the brain your talking about ,but my superior Sagittal Sinus is pluged all the way down to my torcular from 4 embolisation from what my doctors told me.But I’m 57 years old and they didn’t find my AVM till it had grown all kinds of new ways to drain. Wish I could tell you more .
Gordon

Hello Norwin,

My surgical records from the NINDS at NIH state that the "malformation has a draining vein that drains deep into the Vein Of Galen."
I am not sure if that means that I have a VOG AVM or not. I am in my 40’s now. I still have part of the AVM in my Right Frontal Lobe the doctors could not remove. I will go back and ask my doctor if they removed only part of the AVM did they leave any of the drainage system, and how that works?

Take a look at this link: http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/jns.1992.76.2.0239?journalCode=jns

The description of this link is the following: An analysis of the venous drainage system as a factor in hemorrhage from arteriovenous malformations.

The authors studied the venous drainage system and its impairment in relation to risk of hemorrhage in 108 cases of supratentorial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The proportion of AVM’s undergoing hemorrhage (hemorrhagic rate) was calculated in relation to: 1) the number of draining veins (one, two, or three or more); 2) the presence or absence of impairment in venous drainage (severe stenosis or occlusion in draining veins); and 3) the location of draining veins (deep venous drainage alone, superficial venous drainage alone, or a combination of the two). Statistical analysis demonstrated that AVM’s with the following characteristics had a high risk of hemorrhage: 1) one draining vein (hemorrhagic rate 89% in 54 patients); 2) severely impaired venous drainage (hemorrhagic rate 94% in 18 patients); and 3) deep venous drainage alone (hemorrhagic rate 94% in 32 patients).

Hope this helps and maybe answers some of your questions.

what do you mean lost. our dr said they could not locate a draining vein and we are having repeat angio in 2 weeks.

Hi Rachel,

Thank you so much for this info and insight. I guess what we need to do is find out exactly where the stenosis occurred in Jarrod’s head. Will contact his surgeons accordingly and post some more info.

Regards,
Norwin

Looking for now said:

Hello Norwin,

My surgical records from the NINDS at NIH state that the "malformation has a draining vein that drains deep into the Vein Of Galen."
I am not sure if that means that I have a VOG AVM or not. I am in my 40’s now. I still have part of the AVM in my Right Frontal Lobe the doctors could not remove. I will go back and ask my doctor if they removed only part of the AVM did they leave any of the drainage system, and how that works?

Take a look at this link: http://thejns.org/doi/abs/10.3171/jns.1992.76.2.0239?journalCode=jns

The description of this link is the following: An analysis of the venous drainage system as a factor in hemorrhage from arteriovenous malformations.

The authors studied the venous drainage system and its impairment in relation to risk of hemorrhage in 108 cases of supratentorial arteriovenous malformation (AVM). The proportion of AVM’s undergoing hemorrhage (hemorrhagic rate) was calculated in relation to: 1) the number of draining veins (one, two, or three or more); 2) the presence or absence of impairment in venous drainage (severe stenosis or occlusion in draining veins); and 3) the location of draining veins (deep venous drainage alone, superficial venous drainage alone, or a combination of the two). Statistical analysis demonstrated that AVM’s with the following characteristics had a high risk of hemorrhage: 1) one draining vein (hemorrhagic rate 89% in 54 patients); 2) severely impaired venous drainage (hemorrhagic rate 94% in 18 patients); and 3) deep venous drainage alone (hemorrhagic rate 94% in 32 patients).

Hope this helps and maybe answers some of your questions.