Quantcast

AVM Survivors Network

Problems with coworker

#21

JD12

Hi! I read My Stroke of Insight so long ago, that I, too, need to re-read it! As a retired R.N., I think it should be MUST reading for doctors and nurses, giving them “insight” to needs of patients. Agree?

Lifeisgoog

0 Likes

#22

After seeing this book mentioned, I just got a copy. It will take awhile to read. I read slower than I used to read. Thank you for helping motivate me to get back to reading.

0 Likes

#23

Completely agree on required reading for health folks!

0 Likes

#24

Armand…“You never understand it until you experience it”. That’s how I deal with people that are ignorant or indifferent to our plight. I had a doctor that once told me that I have a “silent disability”. Most people that do not know what I have gone through will look at me and not know I’ve had many brain surgeries, suffered a stroke (left side paralysis) post craniotomy and am in severe head pain daily. Even those that knows my travails see me now and don’t know I struggle with concentration, completing tasks, fine motor skills and some proprioception issues. Prior to the AVM rupture in 2006 and AVM obliteration in 2013 I was detailed oriented, a multi-tasker, extremely active & self sufficient. Now I struggle with memory loss, especially short-term. I have come a long way, I am no longer in a wheelchair and I am able to care for myself however, the struggle is real. I am sorry that perhaps your co-worker missed the class on “empathy” but you continue to give your 100% to your job everyday. Make lists, check it 2/3 times if need be like I do everyday. And in the kindest way possible, let your co-worker know “your opinion, is not my reality”. Do not give he/ she any power. A tool that has helped me is doing brain games on Lumosity and AARP websites. Good luck! Hugs.

2 Likes